Frankly, On Faith: Let Your “No” Be “No”

Frankly, On Faith: Let Your “No” Be “No”

by Molly Jo Realy @RealMojo68

Frankly, On Faith.

Frankly, On Faith

Let’s face it: We’re people pleasers. We don’t like being told “no,” and we don’t always like having to say it. We let others sway us or question our determination.

How often does the following dialogue happen in your conversations:

 

“I can’t.”
“Are you sure?”
“Yeah. I’m too busy.”
“Really?”
“I just don’t want to.”
“But why not?”
“Look, I can’t, okay?”
“Oh, well. If you’re going to be that way about it.”

We end up feeling guilty for not sticking to our original plan, for letting others influence us into changing our minds. We say yes when we’re not sure, or when we know the answer is really “no.”

Matthew 5:37 and James 5:12 both caution us against making promises we can’t keep.

I’m not talking about what movie to watch or food to eat. Those are fluid choices. I mean fundamental decisions and the ones that make you misrepresent yourself. Don’t say something you can’t back up. Don’t offer help if you don’t mean it. And don’t give an explanation if it’s not the truth.

Breaking promises can break trust and relationships. Even with ourselves. We try to explain our way out, spinning the situation or twisting the truth.

Life can take us down a different path than what we planned, but that’s not the same as letting others nudge us when we shouldn’t budge, and we know it. We end up breaking trust. We allow others to undermine our foundation.

Soon it becomes easier to not believe in ourselves, to need others to tell us what to do. It’s harder to stand on our own two feet.

God says to stand firm.

“But most of all, my brothers and sisters, never take an oath, by heaven or earth or anything else. Just say a simple yes or no, so that you will not sin and be condemned.”
~James 5:12, NLT

Saying “no” to someone or something may be the most positive thing you can do for the world around you. Imagine being the person He designed you to be: Full of life, vibrant, encouraging, trustworthy, dependable. Imagine being able to grasp what He has to offer you, because you said “no” to what someone else was offering.

This week, I challenge you to not embellish your conversations, but simply stick to your “no.” No excuses, no exaggerations. Just a simple “no” or “yes.” And then follow it through.

Believe in yourself as He believes in you. The others will follow.

CLICK TO TWEET: Frankly, On Faith: Let Your “No” Be “No”. @realmojo68 #franklyonfaith #franklymydear

Frankly, On Faith: Sometimes, saying "no" can be the most positive thing you can do.

Frankly, On Faith: Sometimes, saying “no” can be the most positive thing you can do.

And Frankly, My Dear . . . That’s all she wrote!

Frankly, On Faith: Cast the First Stone

Frankly, On Faith: Do All Things

by Molly Jo Realy @RealMojo68

Frankly, On Faith.

Frankly, On Faith.

We live in an era that glorifies differences. We’re on one side of the fence or the other, but rarely are we perched atop in perfect balance.

Worse, that fence is not often wire. We can’t, or choose not to, see through to the other side. Our vision is blocked by hard wood or brick, or we’re only allowed a glimpse through holes or slats.

It’s sometimes the same with our actions. We don’t always see how what we do affects others. We don’t always care. We keep heaping our own plates higher and higher, with minimal consideration for “all things in moderation.”

We martyr ourselves in our own minds; believing we have it worse because we feel alone. Unloved. Uncared for. We separate ourselves from our community.

We can’t see the other side of the fence.

It makes it hard to see the other person’s story, to walk a mile in their shoes.

When I’m in a moment of frustration or anger toward someone else, I remember how God forgave me. How He bundled me up, healed my hurts and kissed my forehead. Then, He set me back on my feet and gave me a pat. “Go and make disciples of all the nations.” (Matt 28:19a, NLT).

He didn’t ask me to be perfect, to know everything, or to see the horizon before I took a first step. He just asked me to go. And to do so in a spirit of acceptance and forgiveness.

“They kept demanding an answer, so he stood up again and said, “All right, but let the one who has never sinned throw the first stone!”
~John 8:7, NLT

Instead of using stones to hurt, or to build more walls, try laying a path.

This week, I challenge to take one step closer, to stretch your hand out farther, and to smile at a stranger. Step outside your thought-box and see things from a different perspective. Give someone the grace you would like returned to yourself.

How will you begin to tear down your walls?

CLICK TO TWEET: Frankly, On Faith: Cast the First Stone

With stepping stones and a peaceful heart,
~Molly Jo

Frankly, On Faith: Cast the First Stone

Frankly, On Faith: Cast the First Stone

And Frankly, My Dear . . . That’s all she wrote!